The writing team of Patrick Quentin—also known as Q. Patrick and Jonathan Stagge—began as a collaboration between Philadelphia pharmaceutical executive Richard Wilson Webb (1901‐1966), a native Englishman, and American writer Martha Mott Kelley (1906‐1989). After Kelley left the partnership to marry and settle in England, Webb briefly wrote with future Harper's Bazaar editor Mary Louise White Aswell (1902‐1984) before joining forces in the mid‐1930s with native Englishman Hugh Callingham Wheeler (1912‐1987). The early Q. Patrick books were written as elaborate puzzle mysteries, but Webb's and Wheeler's crime writing increasingly became more psychologically acute with deepened characterization; the later Patrick Quentin novels, in particular, became increasingly dark and brooding. In the 1940s Webb's writing input decreased and he retired from his partnership with Wheeler in 1951. Wheeler went on to write solo as Patrick Quentin until 1965, after which he wrote exclusively for television, film and the stage. One of his last works was the book for the 1979 musical Sweeney Todd, for which he won a Tony award.



$14.95
  • Death Freight & Other Murderous Excursions
  • 978-1-951473-80-8
  • Four classic mystery novelettes written by Hugh Wheeler as "Patrick Quentin" in the 1950s for The American Magazine, with a new introduction by Curtis Evans. July 2022.